Everything You Need To Know About Starting A Criminal Justice Career

The college system in the United States has traditionally been geared towards what many perceived to be ‘typical’ careers. However, this narrative has somewhat changed as we move towards the year 2021. Other viable career choices have emerged as profitable and practical. For example, a degree in one of the criminal justice concentrations is garnering much in the way of popularity.

We will talk about examples of what a degree in criminal justice could look like (as well as the career path one could opt to take down the line). From there, we’ll also discuss some of the academic institutions with top-notch criminal justice degree programs — as well as the costs associated with these degrees. Many will be happy to know that an education in this field could cost considerably less than a traditional four-year school.

Concentrations Within The Field

The field of criminal justice itself is highly diverse. The inclusive nature of criminal justice enables people with all different sorts of personal skills to thrive — both personally and financially. As such, it should come as no surprise to find out that there are a number of degrees offered from underneath the umbrella of criminal justice. Some of those focuses include — but are not limited to — criminology, forensic science, forensic psychology, criminal justice, law, and even accounting.

 

Types of Jobs

Here’s where things get interesting. As mentioned previously with the diversity present, there are a plethora of careers one could enter from being a criminal justice major. From a pay standpoint, lawyers reportedly make the highest median annual salary (over $120,000/year). However, one could also get a job as a homicide detective, a forensic psychologist, or as a criminal investigator. From a prestige standpoint, there are also opportunities working for both Homeland Security and the FBI. One could even attempt to become a Secret Service Agent with a degree in criminal justice.

Degree Options

Could one take the conventional route and earn a degree in Criminal Justice in four years? Absolutely. However, there are programs which shorten the time span of school considerably. In fact, some trade schools even offer Criminal Justice degrees in roughly 10 months (such as UEI Criminal Justice College). There are also online schools/programs for these degrees as well. Much of this will come down to the person’s individual situation. One can theoretically work a job and still take classes for this degree in the evening/on their own time. The interest party must do the research to see which program might be the best for them.

Image Source: Forbes